Images from Origins and Displacements: Making Sense of Place, Histories, and

 

Possibilities

 

 

Artwork by William Camargo 

 

    

About the work: Using photography, installation, public political performances, community archiving, and my role as an arts-based educator, I negotiate the legacies and disempowerment of Brown people in my hometown of Anaheim, California. I respond to the city's archives through a historical art praxis that manifests as series-based artworks and strategies that address geographic places. Working with historically underrepresented narratives means dealing with the effects of systematic erasure, and implementing a critical pedagogical approach with room for further investigation of forgotten stories. By using hyperlocal histories, legacies, and contemporary news stories, I confront and challenge social constructs that are placed upon a city with historically racist policies and ideologies.  I do this through liberatory actions that provoke new interpretations and elevate people's hidden histories to the forefront. These issues of erasure, structural racism, and displacement become universal to other places and histories with similar power structures.

 

 

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After Stephen Shore, but in Penquin City and Paisa, Archival Inkjet Print, 2019

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We Gunna Have To Move Out Soon Fam!, Archival Inkjet Print, 2019

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A Colonist Is A Colonist Is A Colonist, Archival Inkjet Print, 2022

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Livania In Her Living Room, Archival Inkjet Print, 2018

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William Camargo is a photo-based artist and educator born and raised in Anaheim, California. He is currently the Chair of the Heritage and Culture commission in Anaheim and a lecturer in photography at the University of California San Diego. He attained his M.F.A from Claremont Graduate University, a B.F.A. from Cal State Fullerton, and an A.A. at Fullerton Community College. Camargo is the founder and curator of Latinx Diaspora Archives, an archive Instagram page that elevates communities of color through family photos.